Eyes & Brows

Eyelid surgery

What is it?

Eyelid surgery – also called Blepharoplasty – is a surgical procedure that removes excess skin and fat from the upper or lower eyelids and tightens lax muscle. It can improve drooping upper lids and puffy eye-bags in the lower eyelids. Blepharoplasty can be performed alone, or as a combined procedure such as a facelift or brow lift.

What to expect

Upper lid surgery is usually performed under local anaesthetic, as a day case procedure. Some lower lid surgery may have to be performed under general anaesthetic, with an overnight stay, in hospital.

With upper lid surgery an incision is made that follows the natural lines of the eyelid skin, extending into the crow’s feet or laughter lines, at the outer corner of the eyes.

Lower lid surgery involves making a small incision below the eye. Excess fat that is causing the lower eyelids to bulge is removed and, if necessary, the muscles are tightened. The skin is then repositioned over the lid and any extra skin removed, prior to stitching.

Some patients have very little lower lid skin excess and the main issue is an excess of fat. In these cases the procedure may be carried out via an incision on the inside of the eyelid, which leaves no visible scar.

After surgery, a cold pack will be placed over each eye to help ease swelling. Sleeping upright and avoiding stooping and straining can further reduce swelling. You will be given personalised post-surgical advice to help you make a swift recovery.

What results can be achieved?

If you have drooping upper eyelids or puffy eyebags, it can cause you to look tired. Eyelid surgery can freshen up your eye area, giving you a more youthful look.

Patient Stories

Related News

Common risks

All surgery carries risks and cosmetic surgery is no exception. After surgery you are likely to experience:

[ultimate_exp_section title=”Find out more..” text_color=”#000a13″ background_color=”rgba(255,255,255,0.01)” bghovercolor=”#ffffff” title_active_bg=”#ffffff” cnt_bg_color=”rgba(255,255,255,0.01)” icon=”Defaults-plus” new_icon=”Defaults-minus” icon_align=”left” icon_size=”22″ title_alignment=”left” font_family=”font_family:Lato|font_call:Lato|variant:700″ heading_style=”font-weight:700;” title_font_size=”desktop:18px;” title_line_ht=”desktop:22px;” title_padding=”padding:10px;” desc_padding=”padding:10px;”]
  • Swelling and bruising – your surgeon will advise you how long this will last based upon your individual procedure.
  • Bleeding – this is usually minimal with the use of electro-cautery during surgery. However, a little oozing of blood is common, which can add to tissue bruising. Continued bleeding under the skin can lead to a haemtoma, which may require drainage in the operating theatre. This does not normally impact the recovery and final outcome. You may also experience bleeding in the white part of the eye (sub-conjunctival bleed), causing redness. This usually clears up within a few weeks.
  • Eye watering – this is common after eyelid surgery. It is caused by a temporary blockage of one of the tear ducts as a result of swelling. If it does not resolve by itself, antibiotic and/or steroid drops may be needed.
  • Pain – this is not generally severe and can be controlled with over the counter painkillers.
  • Excessive tearing, sensitivity to light and changes to your eyesight can be temporary symptoms, but they normally improve as the swelling subsides.
  • Dissolving skin stitches not holding properly – if this occurs the stitches may need to be removed under local anaesthetic.
  • Dry eyes – keeping the eyes well lubricated, can help. Your surgeon wil recommend eye drops three times a day to protect the eye as the dryness subsides.
[/ultimate_exp_section]

Your surgeon will give you aftercare advice to help you to mitigate any symptoms and promote more rapid recovery.

More serious risks
The symptoms listed above are normally temporary or without serious consequences. There are some more serious risks associated with cosmetic surgery, which will be discussed with your surgeon as part of the initial consultation.

Brow lift

What is it?

A brow lift, also know as browplasty or a forehead lift, tightens the soft tissues of the forehead and lifts the brows to give you a more youthful appearance to the upper part of your face.

What to expect

A brow lift usually involves incisions being made into the scalp and, occasionally, in the forehead and upper eyelids. There are several types of brow lift surgery. Your surgeon will discuss the most appropriate technique for you, based on what you are hoping to achieve and your facial features:

Open brow lift: A long incision is made across the forehead, either around the hairline or in one of the creases of the forehead. Skin is lifted away from the underlying tissues and any excess is removed. The muscles are loosened and the remaining skin is pulled down and brows are stitched into their new position.

Endoscopic brow lift: An endoscope (a long, thin tube with a light at the end attached to a video camera) is inserted through several tiny incisions in the scalp, enabling the surgeon to work on the internal structures of the forehead. This technique involves minimal incisions but may not be suitable for everyone.

Limited incision technique (temporal brow-lift): This is a mix of the two procedures, using limited incisions but without an endoscope. Any scars are hidden in the temporal hairline, although this procedure does not address the centre of the brow.

What results can be achieved?

Brows naturally start to sag as we age and excess skin can hang over our eyes. Sagging or low eyebrows can make you look tired, grumpy or sad. A brow lift can rejuvenate the upper part of your face, smoothing out frown lines or furrows in the forehead and between the eyebrows or across the top of the nose. It can make you look friendlier and happier and restore a more youthful appearance. It raises the eyebrows to a more alert position give you a naturally rejuvenated look.

Possible Risks

All surgery carries risks and cosmetic surgery is no exception. Fortunately, there are rarely any significant complications associated with brow-lift surgery, which is a commonly performed procedure.

After surgery

After brow-lift surgery you are likely to experience:

  • Bruising, swelling, and numbness which should start to subside four or five days after surgery. Bruising may occur below the eyelids and lower lids.
  • Some pain and a sensation of tightness or numbness across the top of the head and brow. Over the counter painkillers should provide relief.
  • A need to wee more often due to the intravenous fluids that were given to you during surgery.
  • The need to sleep with your back and head elevated for a week after surgery.
  • The need for caution while washing your hair to avoid disturbing the stitches.

Common risks

The risk of most types of cosmetic surgery is similar and these will be discussed with you during your consultation. You can help to minimize certain risks by following your surgeon’s advice and instructions after surgery. Some of the common risks include:

[ultimate_exp_section title=”Find out more..” text_color=”#000a13″ background_color=”rgba(255,255,255,0.01)” bghovercolor=”#ffffff” title_active_bg=”#ffffff” cnt_bg_color=”rgba(255,255,255,0.01)” icon=”Defaults-plus” new_icon=”Defaults-minus” icon_align=”left” icon_size=”22″ title_alignment=”left” font_family=”font_family:Lato|font_call:Lato|variant:700″ heading_style=”font-weight:700;” title_font_size=”desktop:18px;” title_line_ht=”desktop:22px;” title_padding=”padding:10px;” desc_padding=”padding:10px;”]
  • Minimal discomfort – this can be treated with over the counter painkillers.
  • Minor swelling and bruising – your surgeon will advise you how long this will last based upon your individual procedure.
  • Scarring – initially the scars will be red but they will fade over time to be virtually invisible. If you choose to repierce your ears, the scars will be hidden beneath your earrings.
  • Dissolving skin stitches not holding properly – if this occurs the stitches may need to be removed under local anaesthetic.
  • Stitch granuloma – sometimes a tender lump or abscess can occur at the stitch site. This is generally more common where the skin is thinner, such as in front of or behind the ear. The stitch may need to be removed or it may be treated with antibiotics.
[/ultimate_exp_section]

Your surgeon will give you aftercare advice to help you to mitigate any symptoms and promote more rapid recovery.

More serious risks
The symptoms listed above are normally temporary or without serious consequences. There are some more serious risks associated with cosmetic surgery, which will be discussed with your surgeon as part of the initial consultation.

Plastic surgery alone cannot change your life but it can give you the confidence to make those changes for yourself.

Follow us:

linkedininstagramenquiries@riversideclinics.co.uk